“A great fire burns within me, but no one stops to warm themselves at it, and passers-by only see a wisp of smoke.” — Vincent van Gogh.

22.male.spanish/australian.

Louis Ginnett (1875-1946),
"Jacinta",
1925,
Oil on Canvas.

Louis Ginnett (1875-1946),

"Jacinta",

1925,

Oil on Canvas.

(Source: pmikos, via sans-articles)

52 plays

London Mozart Players, Matthias Bamert

Grand Characteristic Symphony in C major, Op.31 - III. The Tumult of a Battle
Symphonies

Pavel Vranický, later Germanized as Paul Wranitzky (1756-1808).

From 1790, he conducted both royal theatre orchestras. He was highly respected by MozartHaydn and Beethoven; the latter two preferred him as conductor of their new works (e.g., Beethoven’s First Symphony, in 1800). Wranitzky was a prolific composer: His output comprises ten operas, 44 symphonies, at least 56 string quartets (some sources give a number as high as 73) and a large amount of other orchestral and chamber music.

His opera, Oberon – The Fairy King from 1789 was a favourite in this genre and inspired Emanuel Schikaneder to write the libretto of The Magic Flute for Mozart in 1791; in the mid-1790s, Goethe sought to collaborate with Wranitzky on a sequel to the Mozart opera.

Salvador Dali (1904-1989),
 “La Vierge de Guadalupe”, 
1959,
Oil on canvas.

Salvador Dali (1904-1989),

 La Vierge de Guadalupe”,

1959,

Oil on canvas.

(Source: pixography, via arbole)

42 plays

Karl Richter

Praludium in C minor, BWV 546
Organ Works (Disk Two)

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750).                                                Bach’s abilities as an organist were highly respected throughout Europe during his lifetime, although he was not widely recognised as a great composer until a revival of interest and performances of his music in the first half of the nineteenth century. He is now generally regarded as one of the main composers of the Baroque period, and as one of the greatest composers of all time.

Karl Richter (1926-1981).                 German conductorchoirmasterorganist, and harpsichordist. He was born in Plauen and studied first in Dresden, where he was a member of the Dresdner Kreuzchor and later in Leipzig, where he received his degree in 1949. He studied with Günther RaminCarl Straube and Rudolf Mauersberger. In the same year, he became organist at St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, where Johann Sebastian Bach was once Musical Director.

Oscar Niemeyer (1907-2012),
"Untitled" (Pink Stain),
Silkscreen print on paper,
1990

Oscar Niemeyer (1907-2012),

"Untitled" (Pink Stain),

Silkscreen print on paper,

1990

(Source: tri-ciclo, via primary-yellow)

38 plays

Gaudier Ensemble

Serenade in D major Op.25 - Andante con variazioni
Serenade, Quintet for Piano & Winds, Clarinet Trio

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827).

The Serenade in D major Op.25 was composed c.1801, when Beethoven was around 31 years old. What occasioned Beethoven to write a composition for such an unusual and yet sonorous group of instruments (For flute, violin and viola)? Was it perhaps commissioned by a nobleman who played music with such a group and needed music? Whatever the reason behind it, opus 25 is one of Beethoven’s few chamber music works that did not have a bass instrument.

Despite the unusual combination of instruments, Beethoven had no difficulty in finding a publisher for his serenade; shortly afterwards he even turned to the work again and revised an arrangement for flute and piano (op. 41).

It exists in seven movements:

I.Entrata. Allegro

II.Tempo ordinario d’un minuetto

III.Molto allegro

IV.Andante con variazioni

V.Allegro, scherzando e vivace

VI.Adagio

VII.Allegro, vivace e disinvolto - Presto

Charles Sheeler,
"American Landscape",
1930,
oil on canvas,
Museum of Modern Art, New York

Charles Sheeler,

"American Landscape",

1930,

oil on canvas,

Museum of Modern Art, New York

(Source: arsvitaest, via arsvitaest)

20 plays

London Mozart Players, Matthias Bamert

Symphony in E flat major (1784) - I. Allegro
Symphonies

Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Like his brother Charles (1757–1834), whom he later affectionately
described as ‘an obstinate Handelian’, he was a musical prodigy: when he was six he started taking harpsichord lessons, and a year later was accompanying psalms at St James’s Church under the watchful eye of its organist, Edmund Broderip.
He also studied the violin with Wilhelm Cramer.
In 1774 Dr William Boyce visited the Wesleys and
said to the father, ‘Sir, I hear you have got an
English Mozart in your house.
Despite his Methodist background,
Samuel was strongly attracted to the music of
the Roman Catholic Church and made many
settings of Latin sacred texts; he once
declared: ‘If the Roman Doctrines were like
the Roman Music we should have Heaven on
Earth’.
Although he held no important salaried position
Samuel was acknowledged as the finest
English organist of his day. In 1837 he heard
the young Felix Mendelssohn playing the
organ in Christ Church, Newgate Street and
when Mendelssohn pressed him to play,
Wesley exclaimed, ‘Oh, Sir, you have not
heard me play; you should have heard me
forty years ago!’.

He was also a central figure
in the revival of interest in England of the
music of Johann Sebastian Bach (‘The Man’
or ‘our Demi-God’, as Wesley described him)
and assisted in the publication of a scholarly
edition of Das wohltemperierte Clavier in
1810 –12. He died on 11 October 1837 and
was buried beside his parents and brother in
the graveyard of the little old parish church
of St Marylebone in Marylebone High Street;
their tombstone now stands in the memorial
garden marking the site of the church, which
was demolished in 1949 – a stone’s throw
from the building which, since 1911, has
been the home of the Royal Academy of
Music.

HENRI MATISSE 
Masque au Petit Nez. Aquatint, 1948. 432x346 mm; 17x13 5/8 inches, full margins.
Artist’s proof (there was no published edition). Signed and inscribed “Essai” in pencil, lower margin.

HENRI MATISSE 

Masque au Petit Nez

Aquatint, 1948. 432x346 mm; 17x13 5/8 inches, full margins.

Artist’s proof (there was no published edition). Signed and inscribed “Essai” in pencil, lower margin.

(Source: laurgold, via likeactuallly)

Nándor Katona (Hungarian, 1864-1932), 
"Hegyvidéki táj patakkal" [Mountain landscape with stream].
 Oil on wood, 18.5 x 14.5 cm.

Nándor Katona (Hungarian, 1864-1932), 

"Hegyvidéki táj patakkal" [Mountain landscape with stream].
 Oil on wood, 18.5 x 14.5 cm.

(Source: poboh, via catonhottinroof)

Johann Wilhelm Lindlar (German, 1816–1896)
"A Mountain Torrent"
Oil on canvas, 
108 x 85 cm, 
1860.
Victoria and Albert Museum.

Johann Wilhelm Lindlar (German, 1816–1896)

"A Mountain Torrent"

Oil on canvas,

108 x 85 cm,

1860.

Victoria and Albert Museum.

(Source: arcadiainteriorana, via nataliakoptseva)

48 plays

Yo-Yo Ma

Cello Suite No.6 in D major, BWV 1012 - Gavotte
The 6 Suites For Solo Cello

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750).

It is widely believed that the sixth suite was composed specifically for a five-stringed violoncello piccolo, a smaller cello, roughly the size of a 7/8 normal cello that has a fifth upper string tuned to E, a perfect fifth above the otherwise top string. However, some say there is no substantial evidence to support this claim: whilst three of the sources inform the player that it is written for an instrument à cinq cordes, only Anna Magdalena Bach's manuscript indicates the tunings of the strings.

Other possible instruments for the suite include a cello da spalla, a version of the violoncello piccolo played on the shoulder like a viola, as well as a viola with a fifth string tuned to E, called a viola pomposa. As the range required in this piece is very large, the suite was probably intended for a larger instrument, although it is conceivable that Bach—who was fond of the viola—may have performed the work himself on an arm-held violoncello piccolo. However, it is equally likely that beyond hinting the number of strings, Bach did not intend any specific instrument at all as the construction of instruments in the early 18th century was highly variable.

Ubaldo Gandolfi (Italian, 1728-1781),
"Mercury About to Behead Argus",
ca.1770-75,
Oil on Canvas.

Ubaldo Gandolfi (Italian, 1728-1781),

"Mercury About to Behead Argus",

ca.1770-75,

Oil on Canvas.

(Source: thisblueboy, via elreydelmar)

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